A Migrant Crisis

A paper submitted as part of my MA in Theology discussing the issue of economic migration and how we as the Church should understand our theological response which feeds into the formation of action within the Church.

Introduction

Migration continues to be “an increasingly volatile and contentious political issue”.[1] Following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union this has only worsened. Immigration is now one of the leading areas of concern among people of low income and the issue perceived to be the most outside of their control.[2]

However, if we consider restricting migration and allowing sovereign-states to prioritise the needs of citizens over foreigners, we might assume that it conflicts with a Christian ethical perspective. We must, however, consider and understand the validity of these policies within the broader Christian ethical view and any potential conflicts within the opposing view. Otherwise, we risk damage to the unity of the church, as the divided opinion in culture begins to reflect in that of our church family. It appears that within a Christian ethical view there are grounds for a broader range of opinions on immigration policy including the belief that sovereign-states can restrict economic migration and prioritise the needs of citizens over the needs of foreign economic migrants. There are also several issues presented when reconciling the prevailing view.

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A Migrant Crisis – Andrew D Galpin (PDF)

Notes

[1] Daniel G. Groody, “Crossing the Divide: Foundations of a Theology of Migration and Refugees,” Theological Studies 70 (2009): 639.

[2] Eleanor Taylor, Charlotte Saunders, and Mari Toomse-Smith, Social and Political Attitudes of People on Low Incomes 2017 Report (NatCen Social Research, 2017), accessed December 19, 2017, http://www.bsa.natcen.ac.uk/media/39207/social-and-political-attitudes-of-people-on-low- incomes-2017-full-report.pdf.

Photo by Michał Parzuchowski on Unsplash

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